April 16, 2013

How To Paint Kitchen Cabinets in 10 Easy Steps

After getting over a hundred emails over the course of the past year from readers asking how to paint cabinetry,
(I'm apparently not alone in my old-house-situation!)
 I decided to put together a really simple tutorial to help you with one of the most frequently asked questions I receive:

How on earth do I paint my cabinets???

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!


Painting your cabinetry will take you some time, but it's a lot easier than you might think, and if I can do it, so can you.
(This tutorial also works for bathroom cabinetry, as it's the exact same process I used in two of our bathrooms, here and here.)


How to paint your kitchen cabinets in 10 easy steps

Before we get started, let me just show you just how great our new paint and hardware looks!

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

 As you may remember from this post (where I painted the insides of my cabinets with chalkboard paint), I mentioned that I had just re-painted my cabinets. That was true. When we first moved into this house, the kitchen cabinets had already been painted. It was the worst paint job ever. EVAH. There were heavy brushstrokes everywhere and the spraypainted hinges and hardware were rusty and gross. It was a mess.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

It was not a good example of spray paint usage. And that's coming from a gal who is obsessed with spray paint.
It drove me nuts. 
After painting all of the insides of my cabinets, I was just worn out. So, rather than paint the exteriors the correct way, I just slopped some more paint up over the old paint. I basically just made the horrible paint job from the previous owners worse.

So, what's a girl to do?
I completely ignored the kitchen cabinets for the next 6 months while I worked on other things in our little kitchen like the dirty grout and the gross tile countertop. Then when I was feeling up to it again, I decided I was going to paint the cabinets the right way. I also decided that a great motivator would be to reward myself with brand new fancy hardware for the cabinets when I was done.

So, you may be asking...but, Virginia, my cabinets aren't painted. They're just wood. How does this help me? Well, because after painting countless pieces of old furniture, I can promise you that the process is very similar whether you are painting over old paint or old wood. And I will coach you through the process of painting your cabinets, whether you have cabinets that are covered in paint or just normal wood. Promise.

So, let's get started.
I've narrowed my tutorial down to 10 easy steps.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!


Step #1: Assemble your supplies and set up a workstation.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!


You really don't need much to paint your cabinets. I've seen tons of tutorials that talk about paint thinners and paint sprayers, and they're great. BUT, if you're just a normal person like me who doesn't own expensive equipment, meanwhile trying to not break the bank, but still wanting a great result while doing it yourself, then you can take a much simpler approach.

You'll need the following:
Semi-gloss paint (I used Glidden.)
Primer (This one has great adhesion.)
Angled paintbrush( The Wooster is my go-to brush. I've used it all over my house, and it saves me so much time.)
Mini foam roller (I use this one and LOVE it.)
Sandpaper (I like these little multipacks.)
Drill
Wood filler (I use this one.)
Caulk (This is the one I usually use...it's affordable and does the job.)
*All above links take you to my Amazon affiliate store.

Also, set up a workspace. I did all of this right on my kitchen floor. I just laid out my favorite blanket that I always sit on while I work (it's comfy and washable) and got to it. You'll probably wanna use a dropcloth, but I'm just a weirdo who enjoys her hiney cushioned while she works.
Also, make sure all your stuff (food, dishes, etc.) is out of the way so that you don't get dust in everything.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

Feel free to peruse your eyeballs over that. I realize it's a true delight for the senses.

#2. Remove all of the cabinet doors & hardware.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

Take all of the doors off the cabinet frame, take the drawers out, and remove all of the hinges and hardware from the doors. That pic was snapped about halfway through the removal process.
Now, since I had already painted and labeled my doors with chalkboard paint (seen below)...

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

I didn't need to worry about labeling the doors so that I wouldn't get them confused after I took them off. A good tip (for those of you without a crazy chalkboard obsession) is to put a little piece of masking tape on the back of your cabinets that reminds you where they go.

#3. Sand Door & Frame.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!


This is an important step in the cabinet painting process. It's also the step that makes this tutorial apply to most everyone, regardless of your current cabinet situation. Whether you have layers of goopy old paint on your cabinets or if you just have some sort of polyurethane finish (the shiny stuff) over your wood surface, sanding is what you use to remove it and prep the surface for paint. You could also use thinners and other harsh chemicals, but I really hate that stuff and prefer to sand. I think it's a lot easier, and when you use that stuff you still have to sand when you're done. 
I use 2 types of sandpaper for this step. A high/medium grit (depending on how much gunk you need to remove, get a high grit for lots of goop or a medium grit for medium goop) and a fine grit.
Start with the high/medium grit and just sand everything off. I used a junky electric sander to get the large surfaces and then just got in the little crevices and corners by hand.
Once you've gotten most of the goop off, sand them with a finer grit sandpaper to get rid of any splinters or really rough spots.
NOTE: You shouldn't have to completely remove your paint or clear coat. The goal is to have a fairly raw surface for your new coat of paint to adhere to.
All of this sanding will make your paint adhere better and will give it a nice smooth finish.

#4. Fill Any Holes or Dents with Wood Filler

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

I used Elmer's wood filler to fill in the holes where the old hardware was attached because I wanted my new hardware higher up.  You'll also want to use wood filler on any dings, dents, and scratches.
Apply a small amount, level it off (I'm basically a caveman and just used a butter knife), and let it dry for an hour or so.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

Once the wood filler is completely dry, sand it down level to the surface with a fine grit sandpaper.

#5. If needed, drill necessary holes for your new hardware.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

Funny story....I was a total weakling and no matter how hard I pushed, I couldn't get the dang drill through the wood. Jesse actually drilled all of the holes for the new hardware. I made him take a pic of me pretending to be the best driller on the planet, and because it's so ridiculous and makes me laugh....I'll divulge my shameful secret. 

I called Jesse at work, moody and frustrated telling him how I just couldn't figure out the dang drill.
He came home, tried it, and did it in about 2 seconds. But, then began laughing and admitted that the drill bit was pretty much worthless and as dull as a watermelon. 
And then to punish him for owning a worthless drill bit, I made him take my picture.
Because boys hate taking pictures.

 If you're a normal person with a normal drill bit, you should be able to do this on your own. But, if you're like me and have a worthless drill bit, just make your beefy-armed husband do it and then take a fake photo and pretend you did it. :)

Moving on!!

#6. Caulk.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

Caulk is such a magical little substance. I used it all over the place on these junky old cabinets. Before you paint, caulk between every gap or seam you can find. It will give you the absolute best end result because it makes everything look totally seamless and perfect.

#7. Prime.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

Priming your cabinets is really important when it comes to the durability of your paint job. Whether you have unpainted cabinets or already painted cabinets, this will cover up any stains, make your new paint adhere like superglue, and give you a durable result. Prime everything...doors, drawers, and cabinet frame.
Make sure you follow the exact same steps while priming that I'm about to show you below in step #8. Both your primer and your paint should be applied the same exact way. But, as far as the order goes...prime first, let dry, then paint.

#8. Paint.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

My favorite paint for cabinetry is called Silky White. It's actually Behr Silky White, but I get it mixed in Glidden because it's cheaper. In my experience, for $5 less per quart, there is not a very noticeable difference. 
And I like saving dollars.
 I was able to do all of my cabinetry with 2 quarts of paint. If you've primed your cabinets, your paint should cover pretty easily. I only needed 2 coats of paint on everything.

Now, this is an important part of step #8. 
How you apply your paint is super important in determining how your finished result will look. You want it to look professional, and without any brushstrokes. Most pros use a paint sprayer to accomplish this. But, if you're like me and don't own fancy equipment, you can achieve a brushstroke-free finish without one. 
You'll need 2 things, an angled paintbrush (The one I recommended in the supply list is a lifesaver on this project) and a mini foam roller.
Working in small sections, brush on your paint with the angled paintbrush.  

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

And while the paint is still super wet, go back over all your paint, pressing lightly with your mini foam roller. It's like magic.

I find these little guys at Home Depot for less than $2. I use them on everything...cabinetry, trim, furniture. Love 'em.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

Just remember to work in small sections, going over your brushstrokes as you go with the foam roller.
It will provide you with a flawless finish.

#9. Sand the final coat of paint and finish with Polycrylic.**

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

**I've had a few questions about this step, so let me clarify. I used a satin finish paint on my cabinets because of what poor condition the wood was in. Satin paint has less sheen than semi-gloss (what you would normally use) and therefore shows less imperfections. Sanding a satin finish just smooths it out and creates a nice finish. If you use a semi-gloss (which would work best if your cabinets are in good shape), you shouldn't sand the final coat.***

Once you've painted your two coats and allowed them to dry overnight, use a really fine grit sandpaper to give everything a really light final sanding. Get the finest grit you can find...the sandpaper package should say something like 'final finish' on it. After you've sanded the final coat of paint, if you want your finish to last a long time, I recommend coating with a satin polycrylic. 

#10. Attach Doors & Hardware
This is the final step, and my absolute favorite out of all the steps. It's time to put the doors back on the frame and attach the new hardware! 

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

After spending a good few days on finally painting the cabinets the right way, putting brand new hardware on them was like the pot of gold at the end of a really labor-intensive-rainbow.
Or something.



Ever since we moved into this house 3 years ago, I've been hoping to upgrade our kitchen with nice high-end hardware. It's like jewelry for cabinets....and frankly, I am a true jewelry luvah. I looked all over the place trying to find affordable, high-quality options and there were very few. 
And then I came across D. Lawless hardware
Not only did they have all of the high-end hardware styles that I get all googly-eyed over, but their prices were absolutely amazing. I was so blessed to contact them and have them offer to furnish our kitchen with new hardware, but even if they hadn't, I honestly think I would have shopped there anyways. 

For all of our drawers, I chose a classic satin nickel cup pull.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!


and for all of the cabinets, I chose a classic Stainless Steel Bar Pull. Can you believe D. Lawless Hardware sells these for about $2 each? (Use code 'livelove' to save 10% on your hardware purchase at D. Lawless Hardware.) I've been obsessed with these super long bar pulls forever, and seeing them in my own kitchen totally makes me do a little hammer dance.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

To replace our awful, goopy, cringe-worthy spray paint hinges, I chose the Satin Nickel hinges.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

Never in my wildest dream would I have thought that I would ever be so happy over a little hinge. 
But when you see the crazy difference it made, maybe you'll understand my hinge-glow.

Also, this is a perfect before/after picture for you to see how drastic the difference is between the awful paint and my new good paint.
Painting things the right way makes a massive difference.

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

I mean seriously.

Now, it's time to check out the difference all of this hard work made in the kitchen.

 10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!

Basically, painting your kitchen cabinets isn't really that hard. It takes some time and effort, but the process is actually rather simple. 
And it's so worth it.

And when you're done, you'll totally feel like this:


That's supposed to be a smile. 

That's all for today!
 Feel free to ask any questions in the comment section below. I'll try to answer them as best I can!

For related posts check out the following:


10 steps to paint your kitchen cabinets the easy way - an easy tutorial anyone can use!




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72 comments:

  1. Great job ! The new hardware make the entire kitchen look so much better, like it's brand new !

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    1. Thanks so much, Marianne! I think so too!!

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    2. Hi Virginia, I was wondering if you could do a post on how to caulk, i know its silly but i have no idea how! lol can you explain what caulk you use, how you get it smooth, how you apply it , drying instructions and what not?! would be sooo helpful!!! you really explain things soo well! Would love the help!!

      Jessica :)

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  2. So pretty and I love the hardware! Just pinned.
    XO
    Kristin

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  3. I LOVE white cabinets and SO want to paint mine, but I can't bring myself to do it!

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    1. Thanks so much Gwen!!! Don't be scared! I checked out your gorgeous kitchen just today, but struggled to comment from my phone. Your kitchen would be to-die-for with white cabinetry!!!!

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  4. Holy cow girl this is a fantastic post!!! Love this info and I'll be checking and re-checking it this summer when I paint my cabinets!

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    1. Aw! Thanks girl! Well, you know who to holler at if you have any questions!! <3

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  5. She's a stunner! And those hardware prices really are amazing. So glad you went with the cup pulls because they're my favorites. :)

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    1. Thanks Court!! Mine too...love those freakin' cup pulls!! And yeah...crazy good prices, right???

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  6. Have you ever considered chalk paint for painting cabs? I'm trying to convince my husband to let me paint ours and was wondering if it would be easier. Also did you use the same paint for inside? Thanks!

    Love your blog :)

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    1. Thanks so much! To answer your questions....I used the same color paint for the insides, but used a semi-gloss finish so that it cleaned a little easier. The inside of our cabinets were for some reason in better condition that the outsides, so I wasn't as worried about hiding the imperfections on the insides. Also, yes..I've seen tons of people use chalk paint on cabinets. That's a great solution. It basically removes the need to prime since chalk paint adheres really well. However, as far as I know, the only option is a flat finish, so you'll have cabinets with a flat paint finish. I painted a dining table with chalk paint and it was super durable, but the flat finish was hard to clean. So, that's my thought process! Hope that helps! :)

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  7. Wow...I love your tips. Can you just come do mine for me? You are SO good at it!! :-)

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  8. I've painted my cabinets twice and the second time I replaced all the hardware. Makes an amazing difference doesn't it? Your kitchen is so pretty and bright...love everything you've done!

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  9. Serious kitchen envy right here! Can't wait to get started on my own cabinets. Thanks for sharing the hardware website. I thought I was destined to spend my retirement savings on new hardware, but now its within my budget! Yay!

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  10. You did such a great job on your kitchen and shared with us a great tutorial! I really appreciate the link to the hardware as well-what a great price you paid! Now if I can just get my hubs to agree to paint our cabinets!

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  11. Hi! This is such a great tutorial! I will be using it for sure in my new house, the cabinets are ugly! ;) I was wondering if this paint/finish is easy to clean? I clean my cabinet doors ALL the time... I have small kids and we cook a lot... they are always dirty, especially because they are white. So are they easy to clean? Thanks so much! :)

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  12. Dear, on this tutorial you said you use Satin finish paint (Glidden) for the cabinets, cause it reflex's light, so it hides problems better. But on the tutorial on your favorite paints you said you use semi-gloss paint on cabinets, cause it cleans up better. What should I use? Is satin a form of semi-gloss?
    I love your work. I love using white. My kitchen is so dark. I am afraid I will start it and not finish it. Scared!!! Help!

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    1. Hi Lucy! Yes, I used satin finish paint with a satin polycrylic topcoat on my kitchen cabinets to help camoflauge the imperfections in the wood. Due to the polycrylic coating, they clean up well, but because it's a SATIN polycrylic, it still camoflauges all the dents and such. However, in my bathrooms, where the cabinetry was in great shape and had few imperfections, I used a semigloss paint with NO polycrylic topcoat. The semigloss paint has a shiny sheen to it which basically saves you the extra step of having to apply a topcoat because it's more durable than a satin paint by itself. I hope that helps!

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  13. I'm thinking about painting my cabinets white, but am wondering how long it took you to complete your project? Is it something you can do in a weekend if that is all you have planned or did you take you longer?

    Thanks!

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    1. I would plan for a bit longer. It took me just a weekend, but I've done so many paint jobs at this point that I can breeze through them! I think when I first started it would have taken me about a week. :)

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  14. Your kitchen is so much better like that ! ^^

    Melanie ♥ ~ www.shabby-memories.blogspot.fr

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  15. Looks great!! I love your blog, thank you for all your tips and advice :)

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  16. Great tips! I really want to paint my cabinets as well (even though they're new but don't like the wood color), but I'm thinking of all that sanding and the dust in my kitchen. Too much fuss? how many days did it take you to finish the whole project from day 1?
    I'm following your lovely blog via bloglovin' now.

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  17. Did you spray paint the hinges and if so, what did you use on them? I'm getting ready to remodel my kitchen and this tutorial will be very helpful!

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  18. What kind of caulk did you use and what are some other white paints that are best to use if I can find the silky white.. I don't want to just buy a bright whit paint I want somthing similar to yours

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  19. Virgina, I linked to your blog and bragged on your cabinets project here:
    http://decoratemylife.com/how-to-chalk-paint/
    Thanks for the promo code- I ordered the same hardware as you and I love how it turned out!

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  20. I'm getting ready to paint my cabinets and this is a really great post, but I was wondering, did you paint over the caulking and how did you get it smooth?

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  21. I am SO glad I saw your blog. I wanted to update my kitchen... and hired a contractor for the price! I am in the middle of it, but from what I can see, he did an awful job...and my cabinets do not look WHITE like I expected. The spray is uneven, not to mention I had to air my house out for two days! I am completely bummed about it, because it took two weeks and knowing he will be back to put the rest of the doors on tomorrow while I am unsatisfied. Desperate to get it to look nice before a big party next month for my son's first birthday, I am on the web looking for a DIY. I might have to get started next weekend, following your blog. Thanks so much! xo

    Virginia :)

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  22. Hi Virginia,
    This post is very very helpful! We just got a house and there is already brand spankin new wood cabinets. We want to paint them grey/black (we dont like the look of wood). Would you still suggest we sand them down even if they are brand new cabinets? Do you have any suggestions for new cabinets being painted? How long did you spend on them a day?

    Thanks!!!

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  23. looks great. thanks for the tip on the hardware. found you on pinterest and really like the choices you made and might order the same stuff from the same place!! thx!

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  24. Hi Virginia,
    I noticed the cabinets aren't painted on the inside in the before picture and they are in after picture. I am wondering how to paint the INSIDE of the cabinets. Thanks!

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  25. I love the white finish. Can all cabinet finishes be painted if they are not real wood?

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  26. Thank you for this tutorial! Okay, maybe I missed it but, do you sand the actual cabinets before priming or just the doors?? Thanks!

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    1. Hi Jessi! Yes, I sanded the frame of all the cabinets by hand with some medium and fine grit sandpaper before I started painting them. That's how I got rid of all of those brush strokes left by the previous owner. I just did it by hand and it didn't take too long. Hope that helps!

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  27. I received estimates on painting my small kitchen ($2300-$4000). Yikes! I want to do them myself, but have been afraid. Thanks to you and your tutorial I'm gonna do it! I have one question... is the mini paint roller dry when you go over the brushed wet paint or do you have paint on the roller?

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    1. Hi there! Yikes is right! I don't blame you at all for wanting to do them yourself. I did too! :) To answer your question, I pour some paint into the tray that the mini foam roller comes with and just run it back and forth in there for a few seconds to get some paint in the roller. Once you start using it, you'll see how amazing that little roller is for creating a nice finish, and you will feel like you can conquer the painting-world!! :) Good luck!

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  28. Soooo, I want to paint my cabinets mat black with a rustic finish. My question is should I put a final coat of mate clear after I finish the "accent" sanding.

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  29. I have spent hours reading most of what is on your site...I LOVE ALL OF IT! My husband has always said no to painting trim, etc. but after seeing your home, I have decided to veto his no. I have two questions before getting started that I hope you will see and answer :) 1. did you do all the same steps on the interior as you did the exterior (or could I skip any of them)? 2. about how long did it take you to do this project (the exterior)?

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  30. I have the same cabinets in my kitchen which I painted about 10 years ago. They are in need of some sprucing up because I didn't do that great of a job. I am not a fan, at all, of the grooved panels on the fronts of the doors but the cost of replacing has kept me in paint. I am anxious to try your techniques and re-renew my kitchen.

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  31. Wow, lady! Thanks SO MUCH for the awesome tutorial, detailed step-by-step instructions, close-up photos, and links to product names/paint colors, etc. I just moved into an old Victorian apartment that needs a lot of work, and I'm starting with the original cabinets, which are coated with multiple coats of gloppy paint. Your tutorial beats any of the "professional" ones I've found in 2 days' worth of web searching. I've always been intimidated to try DIY projects, but thanks to your blog I'm totally inspired to ACT. You are amazing & I'm grateful!

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    1. Thanks so much Samantha!! Also, if you're cabinets are really goopy and have tons of old paint layered on, you might want to try removing the paint with Citristrip first. It's super easy to use and doesn't smell bad like most paint removers. It will take all of the paint off down to the bare wood and you can start fresh! I didn't know about it at the time when I did this original tutorial, but had I known, I probably would have stripped mine first rather than sanded. Both methods produce similar results, but the Citristrip is a little less labor intensive! :)

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  32. Awesome tutorial! I was wondering if I should still sand everything if my cabinets haven't ever been painted? They are just wooden but I would really like to update them and this is a great idea and cheaper than just replacing them! Thank you so much, your house is gorgeous!

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    1. Hi Charlotte! Thank you so much! Is there a shiny topcoat on your wood cabinets? If there is any sort of protective coating, I would either sand it off or remove it (Citristrip is the easiest way I know to do that.). Then paint. But, if your cabinets are just raw wood, you can go straight to priming and painting.

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  33. I just had to leave you a note of thanks. I did a lot of research before starting on my first "homeowner" project and decided to start small, updating our powder room (in our "built in 1979 house". BTW, our kitchen cabinets look just like yours before - awful! Our powder room wasn't much better. I took my time, tried to be patient, followed your tips, and our powder room looks fantastic!!! Thank you SO much!!!!

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    1. YAY!! That is so wonderful to hear! I'm so so thrilled! Thank you!

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  34. Did you use the same length pull bar on the small cabinets above your fridge?

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  35. Thanks for all this information. I'm painting wood cabinets that just have a clear coating. Do I just need to rough up the coating with the sanding? Some of the lower cabinets are very beat up on the "face" and are pretty much bare-wood and even splintering a little. Would you use wood filler to smooth or just sand smooth? And would you use a satin polycrylic with semi-gloss paint? Is satin polycrylic non-yellowing? Thanks again.

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    1. Hi Maureen! I would either sand them all down, or apply Citristrip to remove the glossy coating. It's really easy to use...just apply and scrape off, and it removes that protective topcoat and any paint. Then you can prime and paint. If any of the wood is splintered or damaged and sanding doesn't help, just use a little wood filler and sand smooth after it's dried. Once you paint over the wood filler, it will look good as new! I would just use semi-gloss paint. Sherwin Williams Advance Pro is a little pricier, but it has a really incredible finish that's pretty durable even without a topcoat. I've been using that a lot on furniture lately. If you opt for using a satin polycrylic, you can use plain ol' flat paint underneath. Polycrylic is non-yellowing, but I've heard a lot of readers say they have trouble getting it to apply evenly. I can usually get it to look pretty good, but it is a bit tricker to apply than regular polyurethane (which totally yellows when applied over white paint.) Hope that answers all of your questions!! :)

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  36. Really lovely! Quick question-what material are your counterops? I have 4 inch white porcelain tiles from the previous owner and cleaning the grout every two weeks or so is getting old... Would like to do quartz but the price is huge...

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    1. Hi there! I think they are granite, but I'm really not 100% sure. It's some sort of stone, but it's pink and gray and I've never really seen anything like it. I actually kind of like it, but I would also love to get marble or quartz if I can ever afford it! Plus, just like you said...the grout gets dingy! :)

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  37. I just came across your blog post via Pinterest today. Your kitchen looks great! I tried the brush and foam roller technique today with my test color. I didn't have the same roller you mentioned, but a foam roller for "ultra smooth" surfaces. I like that it eliminates the brush strokes, but does yours create a little of a textured finish? I thought mine did.
    Also, wondering how your cabinets have held up. I painted my island cabinets about a month ago and they are already chipping. Only step I skipped was the polycrylic coat because I read it was not necessary with a semigloss latex paint.
    Any thoughts?

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    Replies
    1. Hi there! The mini foam roller is what I've always used, as it makes it ultra smooth. I would really recommend that one. As for the chipping, I haven't had that happen on any of my cabinetry, even the ones where I used semi gloss paint and no topcoat. What sort of paint did you use? And did you sand and prime first?

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  38. Hi Virginia, I'm sorry if this is a duplicate post, I'm not sure what happened to my first one and thought maybe you preview them before they go live, but just in case here I am again. :-) I wondered if you painted the insides of your drawers, as well, or left them. I can't decide about removing the tracks and everything, or if you do just the insides, or if you left them altogether and just did the fronts. And whatever you chose, do you like it? Thanks!

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  39. I am getting ready to re-paint my 17 yr old white cabinets that were done w/B.Moore Oil. I believe I need the exact same hinge that you used. Can you provide the model#/size as there were numerous ones on the Lawless Hardware site and all very similar.

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  40. My hubs and I just bought a repo and we sanded, cleaned, degreased, primed, unfortunately chemical stripped (they were BAD) and painted my cabinets. However, the doors (mostly the doors and the two cabinets about the stove) are leaking grease through the paint now. I'm pregnant so I haven't braved the original Kilz since I'm banned from the house when it's used, but do you think we may have to suck it up and use the original to stop the grease bleeds?? I love how your cabinets turned out and I love how mine did too until the grease fiasco of 2014.... poo! Any advice on greasy cabinet messes would be sooooooo appreciated!!

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  41. Love your step by step FUNNY instructions. I had never "realized" that guys really don't like to take photos and laughed out loud at how you made your hubbie take a pic--hilarious! I have never chuckled so much at a DIY set of instructions until today. I think I am almost (?) inspired to redo my parents' cabinets at the lake after your set by step. Thanks so much!

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  42. Did u use the same method for your stairs? I'm redoing mine and haven't a clue how( I redid my kitchen cupboards 2 years ago...and they are ok...but your are amazing, so I'll be doing my cupboards again using your method...but as for staircase...?

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  43. Love your blog and have read this particular post several times and I am finally going to tackle my kitchen next weekend but I do have a question, how did you paint the insides? Mine seem to be particle board not real wood in a light tan color, in good shape just not white. Wasn't sure if I should leave as is or paint them.

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  44. Your kitchen makeover looks fantastic. My husband and I are in the process of buying a home. The kitchen needs some updating as it has outdated oak cabinets and boring walls. We are going to paint the kitchen ourselves and the cabinets are going to be black. My question is ... do you paint the inside of the kitchen drawers of leave them as is? Thank you for any help you can share.

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  45. Your kitchen makeover looks fantastic. My husband and I are in the process of buying a home. The kitchen needs some updating as it has outdated oak cabinets and boring walls. We are going to paint the kitchen ourselves and the cabinets are going to be black. My question is ... do you paint the inside of the kitchen drawers of leave them as is? Thank you for any help you can share.

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  46. This is the perfect tutorial! Simple and beautiful, exactly what I need to start in on my kitchen renovation. I am in the process of purchasing all of the material you have listed and I have one question about the bar pulls. On the D. Lawless hardware sight their are multiple lengths, I think the ones you have are perfect so I was wondering if you know what the measurements were?

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  47. The kitchen looks amazing because you are resourceful! Thanks for the link to D. Lawless, I will be ordering hardware from them, their prices are excellent.

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  48. LOVE your tutorial!!!! I am fixing to paint my cabinets. I will use your method. I only hope it will work as well for me. My cabinets are NOT wood. They are particle board with some kind of laminet covering the particle board. I am in hopes that I can sand them and follow the steps you did. The doors are off and I am ready to go. What are your thoughts??

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  49. LOVE IT. I can't wait to get started with our kitchen!! Thank you so much!

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  50. Hi,

    I just discovered your blog and I love it! I'm pretty new at this kind of stuff, and I'm wanting to paint my now dark brown cabinets, white. Is the process the same, or is it done differently?

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  51. You did an Awsome job! I'm going to ask my landlord if I can update my kitchen ! With your step by step instructions it's a no brainer :) just a little elbow grease !

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  52. Thank you so very much. I just ordered my hinges, pulls and knobs. We live in a rural area and none of the bigger chains had the quanity we needed. And ordering online with them was simple. I love your finished kitchen. Hoping mine will turn out half this good. Need the humidity to go away so I can begin. Trying a deep gray. When complete will post photos on my blog also. Thanks again...Enjoy a great weekend.

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  53. Just discovered your blog today looking for a way to paint a laminate table we picked up cheap … and several hours later I haven't been able to pull myself away! I have ugly tile countertop I've been wanting to change, cabinets I need to paint, grout I hate, and I've been overwhelmed and put it all off. I have hope and inspiration now - and a favorite reference website.

    ON CABINETS - you have some much experience and those Rustoleum kits are expensive, but for a novice do you think it might make sense?

    Thanks for all your time and sharing your talents!

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  54. I am a go on a wild whim kind of gal... you can guess what I will be doing this weekend! My cabinets have the worst paint that scratches off with even the slightest scrap. I think the previous homeowners just threw it on for staging.

    I just started a blog... today! I am hoping to use it to keep up with my hundred crazy projects and ideas. I am by no means a DYI or pintrest queen

    http://ladyincombatboots.blogspot.com/

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Thanks so much for leaving a comment!! I do the hammer dance every time I read one.

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