October 3, 2013

10 Painting Tips & Tricks You Never Knew (Part Three)

10 Paint Secrets (part three): what you never knew about paint. Tip #10 is GENIUS!

It's that time again! Welcome to 10 Paint Secrets Part Three! 
You can catch up on Part One and Part Two if you missed them earlier this year.

For part three, I'm sharing a few of my own trusty paint tips as well as a few new tips that were sent to me by readers (that I eventually tested and out loved). Enjoy!











#1. How to spray paint glass

10 Paint Secrets (part three): what you never knew about paint. Tip #10 is GENIUS!

One of my favorite budget decorating ideas is to buy glass vases at the thrift store and spray paint them to mimic ceramic. It's cheap, looks great, and can update just about any sort of thrift store vase.

10 Paint Secrets (part three): what you never knew about paint. Tip #10 is GENIUS!

To paint glassware, wipe the entire thing with isopropyl alcohol about 10 minutes before you spray paint it. I use this high gloss white spray paint (affiliate link) and with just a few light coats, it turns out super shiny, almost like white ceramic. I wouldn't recommend washing it in the dishwasher, but if handled carefully, it should last for awhile.
Here's an example...I spray painted a glass vase I picked up for $1, and used it on the blue dresser.



#2. Use a dollar store shower curtain as a dropcloth.
After painting more than 20 pieces of thrift store furniture, I've gone through way too many expensive drop cloths. And then I figured out that dollar store shower curtains make a totally decent drop cloth. And they cost a dollar. 



Pick up a few and say goodbye to the days of spending $30 on a canvas drop cloth that won't even fit in the washer.



#3. Put your paintbrush in the fridge. 
This is a tip that a reader sent me. And it's genius. Basically, when you are done painting for the day, just put your paintbrush in a ziploc bag and store it in the fridge. The paint doesn't dry on your brush for up to a week, and you save tons of time not having to wash the paint out of your paintbrush.
 I painted an entire house by myself before learning this. 
WHY.


#4. The oil versus latex test
When painting over existing paint, it's super important to know if the old paint is latex or oil. If you don't know, you can figure it out with this simple test. Just rub a cotton ball soaked in rubbing alcohol over the painted surface. If some of the paint comes off onto the cotton ball, the surface is latex. If not, the surface has been painted with an oil based paint. If it is oil based, make sure to use oil based primer before starting.
 See my tips on oil vs. latex paint here.


#5. The cardboard box trick
Use a cardboard box to prevent overspray when spray painting small items. It's simple and it works. 
And Jesse thanks the reader who suggested this to me, since our yard no longer looks like it's been graffitied. 



#6. Use tacks to elevate small objects when spray painting.
Use tacks to prop up small items when spray painting so that the paint can fully cover it. This works especially great for frames, which is something I frequently spray paint. 


#7. Repair dents on old furniture with wood filler to create a smooth paint finish.
Just fill in any dents with wood filler and once it's dry, sand it smooth with some fine grit sand paper. It's easy to do, and will make your paint job look professional.
You can see some wood filler in action here


#8. How to paint the door and NOT the hinges.
I've painted 15 doors in this house, and I swear by this tip.
 Instead of removing the doors before I paint them, I just cover up all of my hinges with painter's tape, then use an exacto knife to remove the excess. Then I can paint the doors while they are still attached to the frame, and I don't get paint all over the hinges. It's a total timesaver.



#9. The easiest way to gold leaf.
Remember when I silver leafed that entire desk and it was a total nightmare (even though it turned out kinda awesome)? Well, since then I've been searching for an easier alternative and I finally found it...Liquid Leaf (affiliate link). It almost looks like the real thing. And although that jar looks tiny, a little goes a really long way.


You can see an example of when I used some Liquid Leaf to make art here.



#10. Get rid of brushstrokes forever.
This is my favorite tip and totally changed the way I paint. To get rid of brushstrokes, just add a little Floetrol (affiliate link) to your latex paint. 
It's seriously as easy as that.
CAN I GET AN AMEN.

10 Paint Secrets (part three): what you never knew about paint. Tip #10 is GENIUS!


That's all for today! 
Thanks for sharing all of your great tips with me. And thanks for being here. To see part one of this series, go here, or for part two, go here.



10 Paint Secrets (part three): what you never knew about paint. Tip #10 is GENIUS!


Follow my blog with
bloglovin' photo BlogLovin_zps5407d9e3.jpg

pinterest facebook instagram twitter Image Map
Subscribe to LiveLoveDIY with email!
Enter your email address:

36 comments:

  1. I've heard of this floetrol magic but haven't tried it yet! I'm looking around for something to paint so I can try it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm obsessed! It makes such a big difference!!

      Delete
  2. So like you, my house has that dated natural wood trim. I'm going to be painting it soon and I'm wondering if you think the Floetrol will allow me to skip the step where I go over the trim with a foam roller. I have about 2000 sq ft that needs to not look terrible and I would love to save myself some work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You may still have to use the foam roller occasionally, but YES, it will save you so much time!! I totally wish I would have known about it way back when I painted my trim! :)

      Delete
  3. Such amazing and useful tips! Love the tack tip, who knew!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Such great tips and time savers! Thank you so much!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi, Virginia! Thanks for this post! You are so cute and funny. I wish you were here in Greece and that we could do DIY painting together.
    Cheers and keep up the good work,
    Christine

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much Christine!! You are too sweet! xo

      Delete
  6. Virginia, I love all your tips. I did not know about the liquid gold leaf. Now I know I have to try that! ;) I always buy my drop cloths from the Dollar Store. However, the shower curtain idea is great if one needs a thicker drop cloth. :) Thank you for sharing your ideas.

    By the way, Floetrol is my friend, too. lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much Julie! I've never seen actual drop cloths at our dollar stores here...that would be awesome! And yay for Floetrol! :)
      xo

      Delete
  7. Have you ever tried using Floetrol with your recipe for homemade chalk paint? I'm working on my first project EVER - painting a kitchen table - and I plan on making some chalk paint, but I also have Floetrol. Since I'm totally new to this, I wanted to know your thoughts. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't tried it with chalk paint yet, Jess, so I'm not sure. I've only used it with plain interior paint in a flat finish, satin finish, and semi gloss finish. I'm sure I will try it soon though, as I use chalk paint often. :)

      Delete
  8. So much wisdom in one post, thank you so much! And I need to try Floetrol immediately.

    ReplyDelete
  9. shower curtains!!! my fiancé, my yard and I thank you! hugs! Lauren

    ReplyDelete
  10. why am I obsessed with you? omg I know that sounds creepy but you given my not on ly the thrift store diy bug .. but I have given my hubby some little projects here too!!Funny thing is thought of your diy site yesterday at Home Depot when the paint guy mentioned FLOETROL as his HOLY GRAIL! Can I get an Amen!!! Thank you thank you thank you! :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Found this post on Pinterest. I have never heard of putting paintbrushes in the fridge! I actually have one wrapped in Saran wrap right now, that has been sitting on my counter for almost two weeks (ran out of paint for a wall art project and haven't been able to get back to it yet). I'm pretty sure the paint is dried up by now, but I'm afraid to open it up and have to clean it! Will be using the fridge trick going forward!

    Great tip to use shower curtains as drop cloths, too. I use a paint sprayer on furniture in my basement and the plastic I've been using as a drop cloth on our unfinished concrete floors is all icky from painting and sanding. It's time to change them out!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Virginia, I found you site and got inspired. I am redoing an old 9 drawer dresser in a creamy white for my "sales room" as I run a photography business. I LOVED your last tip - but is there a product made for Oil Based Paint too?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Miranda, have a look at the link below:
      http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/OWATROL-OIL-PAINT-CONDITIONER-RUST-INHIBITOR-0-5-Litre-or-1-Litre-/280961848905?pt=UK_DIY_Material_Paint_Varnish_MJ&var=580134312463&hash=item416aa19649

      Virginia, thank you for compiling the tips together! Some if them I've been using, some if them are very new to me and I look forward to trying them.

      It's funny but only yesterday I went and bought a shower curtain to use a drop cloth :)

      I mostly work with chalk paint. You are welcome to pop in! @craftyandbeyond.com

      Delete
    2. Hi Miranda! Yes, you can use a product called Penetrol which is made for oil based paints. I've added a link for it within the post! Thank you! xo

      Delete
  13. Hi, Virginia! I just came across your blog today and girl you are the bomb diggity. I'm loving all of your stuff especially these paint tips. I had no idea about Liquid Leaf and now I know what to use on one of my projects. Thanks! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's so awesome!! Thanks Debbie! xo

      Delete
  14. Great tips! Im thinking to try the floetrol from with my glass paint. Acrylic water based, so I am excited top see if it works. If not I will only have wasted one glass, if it does work though... WOW! I have a tip for painting outlet
    covers, screw heads, and drawer knobs, using Hefty plastic disposable plates. I saved money by removing cover plates and spraying them with a hammered rustoleum spray paint. I used the plastic plate to push the screw heads through the plate slightly so they stand straight up. Then I was able to spray them without touching then. I also used this trick to paint drawer knobs by twisting the screws up through the bottom of the plastic plate and attaching the knob to it so that they to stand straight up... No need to handle them for painting/sealing. Very useful when drying so they don't roll everywhere. Thank you again

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi! Great tips. My little tip is probably common knowledge in the real-painter's world, but for me who attacked my kitchen alone- it was perfect!
    I was going for an aged, Tuscan look for my kitchen walls. I had a picture I took with me to the Columbia paint store, and the rep was awesome!
    I started with a Very yellow base. The kind of yellow that says,"Kill me now. this is so yellow I swear I'm goin to go crazy," I applied that all over with a wide brush, in random strokes (I wanted the stokes to be noticeable.) Then, I mixed 1part Orange-ish paint with 1 part Floetrol and applied it with a rag and wiped in circles. LOVED it! Then, to add a little bit more 'age' to the walls, I mixed 1 part green paint, 1part Floetrol, and 1 part water, it gave just a slight additional interest in dimension & color I was looking for. Amazing what a little guidelines and a lot of creativity an experimenting will do! (Wish I could load a picture of the paint job I am so proud about.)

    ReplyDelete
  16. Anytime I get ready to start a painting project whether it be walls, cabinets, or just about anything I clean it with TSP (tri-sodium phosphate). There's also a TSP alternative. You can find it at any hardware store. It's inexpensive and a little goes a long way. It's an amazing cleaner and you HARDLY ever have to scrub. My aunt's kitchen hadn't been painted in over 20 years and she had grease stains on her ceiling. I sprayed it with the tsp (I use a spray bottle-a little goes a long way) and the grease literally poured off immediately. It took me a little over an hour to prep the ceilings and walls of her kitchen/dining room attachment.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I love your blog!! Can you tell me the paint color of the pale aqua dresser that the white vase is on?? It's beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I used to do the brush in the fridge thing. Now I just put my brush in a plastic bag, period. I don't find the need for the fridge and it stays just as well. I have also used this for paint rollers (garbage bag). Works great. Thanks for all the great tips.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hi Virginia! subscribed because you have some very useful tips! Where can I purchase the liquid leaf? We have a hobby lobby and Michael's and a joann's do you know if they carry it? Thanks again love your tips keep it up!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hi Virginia! thanks for the wonderful tips! Love the liquid gold can you tell me where they sell it? Thanks again!

    ReplyDelete
  21. OK Virginia, I have just spent my whole day reading your blog! Thank you so much for your valuable info and I am going to try and not repeat your mistakes! I've spray painted in the past but I still haven't learned how to do it well. OK, I'm a perfectionist! I'm about to embark on a total redo of my home. Like you we moved into a home that has all natural wood trim. Yuck! So I'm going to paint it all. Also, I bought a kitchen table and chairs on Craigslist for $75. It's not in great shape, so I'm also going to paint that. I just bought a Critter spray gun on line at Amazon. I have heard really great things about it because you use mason jars to put the paint in. Great for cleanup. So finally, I'm now to my questions! When you paint your tables, do you paint the underside of the top? Also, have you ever painted a table that has a split for a leaf? Do you paint down the insides of the split? I'm worried about it closing tightly after painting. Love your blog, keep posting!!!

    ReplyDelete
  22. I can't believe how much I've learned from all your painting tips!! I consider myself a somewhat experienced painter because my dad was a house painter for 30+ years and taught me. But your tips are new and brilliant! Thank you so much for taking the time to share them all with us! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know right? I thought I knew some tips but putting the paintbrush in the fridge has to be the best thing I've ever heard. Trying floetrol next. Also, sorry for randomly responding months later but, as usual I'm unfashionably late to the paint party. :)

      Delete
  23. Awesome tips! So glad I found your blog! My favorite tip is the paintbrush in the fridge. I HATE cleaning out paintbrushes multiple times. I am wondering what your favorite finishes are for wall paint and furniture paint? I get so confused!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Hi Virginia! I came across your blog while checking out paints made specifically for glass. I have these really cool pens called "Glaze" by Sakura Japan. They make a large variety of rolling ink pens (Gelly Roll on Amazon). While these special pens create a 3D painted look on glass, they are somewhat difficult to work with as the ink will run if the object you're painting is tipped slightly (like on a drinking glass) and it takes a little to dry. I have only played around with them a little, so I don't know their full capacity yet. HOWEVER, what attracted me to your blog is I am an Arts & Crafts fanatic at heart, as I've guessed you are as well! Before I left my home in L.A., CA, I had about 40 cans of spray paint in every color & finish of the rainbow. I spray painted everything that wasn't nailed down (my 6 cats were excluded from my spray paint frenzies!)! BTW, I have been the proud mom of several fat felines!! I <3 THEM ALL! Anyway, I left CA about 7 years ago, 6 kiddies in tow, and had to donate all my spray paint to a friend who helped me pack (stupid movers wouldn't let me take them JUST cause they could maybe explode during the moving/storage time in NY!). I had been diagnosed with fibromyalgia about 5 years prior and was completely unable to work as I could barely get out of bed from extreme pain! But, strangely it turned out to be something good out of something horrible... my kreative talents started to flow! I would lay in bed and make jewelry (my first endeavors were necklaces for cats & dogs!), then glitter came into my life, and then rhinestones... ADD SOME SPARKLE TO YOUR DAY & YOUR BLUES WILL GO AWAY!! I left NY after 5 years and now live in Florida... the Sweat Box of the World! My apartment looks like a small retail store! Every item I see can be made more beautiful with some paint or glitter or rhinestones!! THIS is what has kept me going over the past 12+ years of pain, exhaustion, fatigue, depression... that & my Sweet Babies (now I have 4 kiddies, apartment living here is very strict!)!! So, needless to say, when I saw your picture with your baby fattie kitty, and read about your passion to change the world, one beautiful thing at a time, I felt a real kinship! And the Southern inflection you add to your written words is too cute, as well as your little side notes that are so funny!! YOU are adorable and you make me feel happy! So, THANK YOU, VIRGINIA... there may not be a Santa Claus, but there is YOU! I look forward to feeling well enough to start my own blog as well as selling the thousands of dollars of jewelry & gift items I've made over the years! Looking forward to "seeing" you soon! Blessings~ Kat of Fairy Kat Kreations

    ReplyDelete
  25. Coat hinges and hardware with rubber cement before painting. Then simply peel the rubber cement off after painting. Paint-free hardware!

    ReplyDelete
  26. Another fun tip...when you're finished with a roller (I use really cheap ones and don't wash/reuse), put it in a ziplock and put it in the freezer labeled with color and room info. When you need touch ups...viola...thaw the roller and get after it!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Thank you for all of your tips! When I started working in my store's paint department, your blog really enlightened me to be able to give advice that our training didn't exactly cover! You're awesome!

    ReplyDelete

Thanks so much for leaving a comment!! I do the hammer dance every time I read one.

Quick and Easy LiveLoveDIY Projects

Mod Podge Hangers Photo Wall Ideas Sequin Art Chalkboard Cabinets Gold Leaf Art Stacked Log Tutorial